Usability

2012

Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Dangler
Highslide JS
Usability Poster
Highslide JS
Usability Participant Gifts
Highslide JS
Leading the Team
Highslide JS
Leading the Team


2014

Highslide JS
Usability Study - In-Process
Highslide JS
Usability Study - In-Process
Highslide JS
Usability Study - In-Process
Highslide JS
Leading the Team


Introducing Usability and Empathy Map - Presentation for Team

Highslide JS
WPF - UI Control Library
Highslide JS
WPF - UI Control Library
Highslide JS
WPF - UI Control Library
Highslide JS
WPF - UI Control Library

Usability Presentations

 User eXperience re-defined.PDF

 Mobile Web Experience.PDF

 


Process of Usability Study - How do we do it?

A usability test is intended to determine the extent an interface facilitates a user’s ability to complete routine tasks.

The purpose of this usability study was to evaluate the design of the product & see if it works as intended for anyone with basic computer knowledge by identifying the problem areas, while users are performing their core tasks.

(During this session, participants were asked to complete some tasks using the application and fill out few questionnaires.  As they complete the tasks, members of the User Experience {UX} Team observed and volunteers took notes.  In addition, the sessions were captured on video for future review.  Each session lasted for an hour approximately.)

Methodology (Participants)

(Participants were recruited from different teams prior to testing. Each participant was compensated with goodies for their time.

Note: Industry Standards & best practices says that the a minimum of 5 users would be needed to detect approximately 85% of the problems in an interface, given that the probability a user would encounter a problem is about 31%. Source: http://www.measuringusability.com/five-users.php)

Summary of Findings

(Points are collected in 3 different categories.)

(Areas of improvement are categorised in as High, Medium and Low.)

Usability Metrics

(Follow Usability Metrics standard.)

Effectiveness [Task Completion]

(Effectiveness, another aspect of Usability is usually measured by determining how many tasks, participants are able to complete. It is a way of trying to understand better how successfully users will be able to use an application. Effectiveness is measured by reviewing the completion rates for tasks.)

Efficiency [Time on Task]

(Efficiency [Time on Task], an essential aspect of Usability is usually measured by determining how quickly participants are able to complete scenarios or tasks. Participants may be able to successfully complete an activity, but they take a long time which is compared with optimal time for each task in minutes.)

System Usability Score (SUS)

(Satisfaction, another aspect of Usability can be measured from a System Usability Scale (SUS) survey. SUS scores can range from 0 (very little satisfaction) to 100 (very high satisfaction).

The system usability scale (SUS) is a simple, industry standard, ten-item attitude Likert scale giving a global view of subjective assessments of usability. SUS scores have a range of 0 to 100.)

Appendices

 http://www.measuringusability.com/sus.php
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System_usability_scale
 http://www.useit.com/alertbox/20000319.html
 http://www.techsmith.com/morae.html

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